3 Rules to Break When Coloring Natural Hair


I am extremely pleased with the way my color and highlights turned out this time around. But I realized that I didn’t follow three of the most of the cardinal rules of coloring hair. My main interest is in preserving the integrity of the hair and I take every precaution when I use color. The rules that I broke to achieve this look actually benefit the hair!

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My newly highlighted locks

As a cosmetologist, I only use professional color on my hair. The range of options of color are infinite with a good color line and skilled use of lightener. I would advise anyone considering a major color change to have a consultation with a licensed cosmetologist.

Rules to Break!

1. Always Perform a Shampoo Cap or Demi-Permanent  to Prevent a Line of Demarcation

When retouching the regrowth (roots) of the hair with the same level of color that has been previously applied, the rule is to apply color to the regrowth and then either do a shampoo cap or demi-permanent matching color to refresh the previously colored hair. This is to prevent a line of demarcation to show between the freshly colored regrowth and the previously colored hair at the midshaft and ends. That rule can be broken for natural hair! I break this rule for 2 reasons. 1. Overlapping color was causing my hair to become dry and brittle. 2. My hair is high porosity, and it would absorb a lot of expensive product. I tried retouching my regrowth only, and I found that there is no detectable line of demarcation because my hair has a curl pattern that hides it! This is one great way that I save money and save product.

2. Always Thin Weave Hair for a Natural Look

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Image is from a Pinterest site, I do not own this image

Normally, I am not a big fan of stripe highlights or thick weave highlights. Stripe highlights, as shown in the picture above, are created by highlighting alternating partings that are one-quarter to one-half inch thick in the “mohawk” section of the hair. Weave highlights are created by taking one-quarter to one-half inch parting of hair and “weaving” it to break up the harsh stripe line. This can be done in a thick or thin pattern. On straight hair, the rule of thumb is the thinner the weave, the more natural the resulting highlights will look. However with natural hair, I break this rule to get the effect I am looking for. There are 2 reasons why I break this rule. 1. Parting natural hair in a dry state must be done carefully. 2. It is easier to weave, pull apart and control thick weave in natural hair than thin weave in natural hair. The curl pattern of the hair blends the thick weave  and gives the hair a more natural look. This is a great method to get the highlight you want without causing excessive breakage, damage, and tangling.

3. Use Higher Volume Developers to Achieve More Lift in Color

This rule to break is totally a personal rule for my hair that I have arrived at through trial and error. I do not use any developer over 10 Volume in my hair when applying hair color. I have found that at higher volumes, my hair gets extremely dry and damaged. I just know my hair and it’s limitations, and I can live with the trade-off of less color choices to protect the integrity of my hair.With lightener, I was taught that the hair will lift with the lowest volume developer, but it will just take longer to achieve the level desired. In the picture of my hair, I achieved the lightest blonde streaks with lightener and 10 volume developer.

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Hair care is a family affair

I hope you benefit from my rebellious streak and take a chance on hair color!

Please let me know if this information was helpful! ❤ Ally

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