7 Regimen Shortcuts Without Sacrificing Healthy Hair


Over the past few weeks, I’m learning what it is like to not have the 4 hours I used to have to do my hair. I used to be able to take all morning washing, conditioning, sitting under the dryer…all at my leisure. Now I’m in spritz and go mode and scratch it as it itches haha. But I have developed some shortcuts that may be helpful to someone looking to shorten their hair routine. 
1. The most significant change I made was to wear my hair in a twisted updo. I still wash and condition every week-week and a half or so, but I keep it up and out-of-the-way so the only thing I have to style in the morning is the bang. I was surprised that detangling my hair was not so bad after not washing my hair for almost 2 weeks. I did have about double the shedding I normally have, which still was not a lot of hair. Keeping my hair stretched in this protective style has helped with the detangling I think. I keep my spray bottle close when I need to spritz and re-twist my protective style.
2. To save time on styling my hair into the protective style, as I detangle my hair, I place my partings where I want them in the style so I don’t have to re-part my hair after I put my curl cream on. Re-parting can cause the hair to shrink and curl back up and results in lost time trying to re-stretch the hair.
3. The next discovery I made in the salon…My edges were out of control, and I just wanted something to tack it down. So I used the American Crew pomade for men that I had in the salon. Did the trick! Why buy an expensive edge control gel when you may already have something that works in your home (or salon)?
4. The next thing I did was to trim my ends. I want to make sure that even though I don’t have the time to do certain things to my hair, I need to stick to the foundation of what will keep my hair healthy. So I just put my hair into 4 sections and trimmed about a 1/2 inch off each section. I’m not concerned about layering and all of that since my hair is up in a protective style.
5. I also colored my hair back down to a level 4-I thought it was going to have a brighter red/violet look, but that’s alright. By going back to a tone that is close to my natural level, I don’t have to worry about coloring it for a while, which saves me time. And it allows my hair time to grow and come back healthy when I’m ready to color it in the spring.

6. Use sample sizes as travel sizes and keep your most useful styling product handy in case of an emergency. Jane Carter Solution was gracious enough to send me samples of their Curl Defining Creme and their Nourish and Shine, and I keep one of each in my purse! They give just enough product to smooth and place a set style to keep it looking finished.

7. Try head wraps! I received my Fanm Djanm headwraps last week, and they were right on time. I followed the YouTube tutorial on how to tie it, and within a minute or two I had a professional, attractive style for work.

As we know, there are things you just can not skip, like thorough washing, conditioning well, and using the right products to keep your hair moisturized. That is non-negotiable.
 But everything else can be managed. Even on shorter hair, headbands and hair ornaments go a long way to make a style look polished. I hope these tips were helpful, and if I come up with any more, I will update the post.
Please feel free to comment on this post! ❤ Ally

 

 

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Toning It Down For Fall


Summer to Fall Hair

After a summer of heavy bleach abuse on my hair, it was time to take it down a notch. I still find it incredible that when my hair was relaxed, any time I tried to color it, my hair would be breaking off the next week. Now, I can lighten and color, all with care and proper moisture balance, and still have a healthy hair journey.

Color Preparation For the Hair

To prepare my hair for color, I deep conditioned my hair two days before I applied the color filler, as explained below. I put a small amount of leave-in conditioner on my hair, but no curl cream because it could impede the color from processing correctly.

2-Step Color Process in Detail

I achieved this more natural hair color look in a 2 step process:

1. Use a color filler for highlights so the dye will hold in the hair.

When lightener is applied to the hair, the lightener removes the pigmentation in the hair strand, causing it to become blonde over the processing time. In order to darken the hair again, a preliminary filler should be used, which replaces some pigment by processing it back into the hair strands.

My filler was a level 7 dark blonde color with 10 volume developer applied to the highlights only. I allowed that to process for 30 minutes, rinsed, shampooed and conditioned, and allowed to air dry. The following day I applied the final color, explained in the next step.

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Hair with Filler Color Applied

2. Allow filler to set and apply final color process.

After 24 hours, the filler color was sufficiently set into my hair. Because I used low volume developer, a second color process would pose a minimal risk of damage to my hair. For the final color, I used a combination of level 5 color for my new growth and feathered it into the midshaft, and a level 7 color for the ends to give the hair some natural dimension with 10 volume developer. After 45 minutes of processing time (for those stubborn grays), I washed my hair normally and prepared it for styling.

Styling and Care for New Color

Before I colored my hair, I cut more layers into it by using the controlled-shape trim method . After a color process I do not like to band my hair tightly or restrict the hair from drying because it may adversely affect the color. After applying my curl cream, I banded my hair very loosely and allowed it to air dry. I removed the bands when my hair was damp and wore it out the rest of the day. I loosely banded my hair into a pineapple for overnight care. The hair should not be washed for at least 48 hours after a color process to allow the color to set into the hair. I’m loving the color and shape of my hair more and more as it grows!

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Please let me know if this information was helpful! Ally

3 Rules to Break When Coloring Natural Hair


I am extremely pleased with the way my color and highlights turned out this time around. But I realized that I didn’t follow three of the most of the cardinal rules of coloring hair. My main interest is in preserving the integrity of the hair and I take every precaution when I use color. The rules that I broke to achieve this look actually benefit the hair!

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My newly highlighted locks

As a cosmetologist, I only use professional color on my hair. The range of options of color are infinite with a good color line and skilled use of lightener. I would advise anyone considering a major color change to have a consultation with a licensed cosmetologist.

Rules to Break!

1. Always Perform a Shampoo Cap or Demi-Permanent  to Prevent a Line of Demarcation

When retouching the regrowth (roots) of the hair with the same level of color that has been previously applied, the rule is to apply color to the regrowth and then either do a shampoo cap or demi-permanent matching color to refresh the previously colored hair. This is to prevent a line of demarcation to show between the freshly colored regrowth and the previously colored hair at the midshaft and ends. That rule can be broken for natural hair! I break this rule for 2 reasons. 1. Overlapping color was causing my hair to become dry and brittle. 2. My hair is high porosity, and it would absorb a lot of expensive product. I tried retouching my regrowth only, and I found that there is no detectable line of demarcation because my hair has a curl pattern that hides it! This is one great way that I save money and save product.

2. Always Thin Weave Hair for a Natural Look

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Image is from a Pinterest site, I do not own this image

Normally, I am not a big fan of stripe highlights or thick weave highlights. Stripe highlights, as shown in the picture above, are created by highlighting alternating partings that are one-quarter to one-half inch thick in the “mohawk” section of the hair. Weave highlights are created by taking one-quarter to one-half inch parting of hair and “weaving” it to break up the harsh stripe line. This can be done in a thick or thin pattern. On straight hair, the rule of thumb is the thinner the weave, the more natural the resulting highlights will look. However with natural hair, I break this rule to get the effect I am looking for. There are 2 reasons why I break this rule. 1. Parting natural hair in a dry state must be done carefully. 2. It is easier to weave, pull apart and control thick weave in natural hair than thin weave in natural hair. The curl pattern of the hair blends the thick weave  and gives the hair a more natural look. This is a great method to get the highlight you want without causing excessive breakage, damage, and tangling.

3. Use Higher Volume Developers to Achieve More Lift in Color

This rule to break is totally a personal rule for my hair that I have arrived at through trial and error. I do not use any developer over 10 Volume in my hair when applying hair color. I have found that at higher volumes, my hair gets extremely dry and damaged. I just know my hair and it’s limitations, and I can live with the trade-off of less color choices to protect the integrity of my hair.With lightener, I was taught that the hair will lift with the lowest volume developer, but it will just take longer to achieve the level desired. In the picture of my hair, I achieved the lightest blonde streaks with lightener and 10 volume developer.

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Hair care is a family affair

I hope you benefit from my rebellious streak and take a chance on hair color!

Please let me know if this information was helpful! ❤ Ally